Reporting on religion in the post-9/11 world

Friday, October 15, 2010

WASHINGTON — The Religious Freedom Education Project at the Newseum and the McCormick Foundation Civics Program are sponsoring a discussion on “Covering Religion in the post-9/11 World” at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 26, at the Knight Conference Center at the Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C.

Recent events in the United States — from anti-mosque protests to threats
of Quran burning — are stark reminders that, particularly after the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, religion matters. For journalists, covering domestic and world events requires taking religion seriously. But how well do journalists report the religious dimension of the news? Do the news media help or hurt as Americans struggle to understand the complex and contentious issues surrounding the role of religion in politics and society?

Join leading experts in journalism, religion and public affairs for a timely
discussion of news coverage of religion in our perilous times. Panelists for the program include:

  • Phil Bennett, professor of the practice of journalism and public policy,
    Duke University, and former managing editor of The Washington Post.
  • Stephen Burgard, director, School of Journalism at Northeastern University.
  • Benjamin J. Hubbard, professor emeritus, California State University, Fullerton.
  • Debra L. Mason, director, Center on Religion and the Professions
    at the University of Missouri and executive director, Religion Newswriters Association.

Moderator for the discussion will be Charles Haynes, director of the Religious Freedom Education Project at the Newseum and senior scholar at the First Amendment Center.

Attendees should use the Sixth Street entrance to the Newseum. Parking is available in the area. Although there is no fee for attending, registration is required. Please RSVP to Ashlie Hampton at, or 202-292-6288.

The First Amendment Center is a program of the Freedom Forum, and affiliated with the Newseum. The First Amendment Center’s nonpartisan work supports the First Amendment and builds understanding of its core freedoms through education, information and entertainment. The center does not lobby or litigate.

The McCormick Foundation Civics Program seeks to improve access to quality civic education and engagement opportunities in Chicagoland for youth ages 12-22. The Civics Program pursues this vision by delivering the content and services that serve youth and teachers; funding organizations that improve civic education and engagement; and by advocating for policy changes that impact the civic education system.

Ashlie Hampton